Fitness for the Fairways Episode 8 - Expressing Explosiveness in the Golf Swing Through Training

On Episode 8 of the Fitness for the Fairways podcast, we sat down with Pam Owens, a strength coach that works with golfers at Royal Oaks Country Club in Houston, Texas

Pam, who was named a 2018 Golf Digest 50 Best Golf-Fitness Professional in America, discussed power training with us as well as how to handle golfers that might not be compliant with their training programs. We talked about how it's much more beneficial to be all-in on a subpar regimen than it is to complete half the work in the best program ever written.

If you enjoyed this conversation and want to learn more about Pam, check out the avenues below to access more of her content. You can also work with Pam online by checking out the services she provides on her website (link below).

Instagram: @pamowensfitness

Website: www.pamowensfitness.com

Email: powens@pamowensfitness.com

90/90 Passive Range Holds for Hip Mobility

We get asked all the time what the best hip mobility exercise is.

Unfortunately, we never have a concrete answer because case-specific questions like this can be answered hundreds of ways.

With this in mind, there are certain drills we like to see our clients execute to ensure we’re progressing in the right direction. 90/90 Hip External Rotation Passive Range Holds are one of those drills.

The video below is a snippet from one of our Virtual Kinstretch Program’s classes, which focused on improving active control of hip external rotation. If you’re able to perform this drill, there’s a good chance you have solid control of your range of motion.

Once you execute these Passive Range Holds, be honest with yourself. Was this drill easy, or did you struggle through it and deal with cramps? If this was difficult, you need to keep working on improving your hips. Hip mobility, just like any other type of skill acquisition, comes down to repeated exposure and execution with intent.

With this in mind, we want to offer you the opportunity to take your mobility training to levels you never thought possible. Our Virtual Kinstretch Program was built with one goal in mind - to provide an interactive experience to help you achieve your mobility goals if you don’t have access to in-person training.

For just a dollar, here’s what you’ll receive:

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Have further questions about our Virtual Kinstretch Program or other services we offer? Drop a line below and we’ll get back to you!

Fitness for the Fairways Episode 7 - Practice with Purpose for Optimal Skill Development

On Episode 7 of the Fitness for the Fairways podcast, we sat down with Nathalie Filler, a Teaching Professional at Philadelphia Cricket Club and Old Palm Golf Club.

Nathalie, our first swing instructor on the show, sat down with us to discuss common flaws she sees with amateur golfers practice routines and what you should be doing to ensure you're having productive training sessions. We also had a fantastic conversation about early specialization amongst youth golfers and why variability through play is crucial to her junior programs.

If you enjoyed this conversation and want to learn more about Nathalie, check out the avenues below to access more of her content. You can also work with Nathalie online by checking out the services she provides on her website).

Instagram: @nattiegolf

Website: www.nattiegolf.com

Email: nat@nattiegolf.com

Shave Strokes off Your Game by Sinking More Putts [INFOGRAPHIC]

Are you somebody that finds a bunch of fairways and greens in regulation, but struggles in scoring opportunities because of your putter? 3-putting is detrimental to your scores and we need to do our best to avoid them to the best of our ability.

In today’s infographic, Mike Midgette, PGA, gives us the fundamentals of the ideal putting stroke and the things you should focus on with your next birdie opportunity.

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Did you enjoy this infographic and find it helpful? Expect more in the near future. Drop a line below if there’s anything you’d like to see specifically!

Fitness for the Fairways Episode 6 - Optimize Your Health Through Golf and the Weight Room

On Episode 6 of the Fitness for the Fairways podcast, we sat down with Kaitlyn Pimentel, the Founder of Felix Fortis Golf.

Kaitlyn, who you might also know as Kaitlyn Sharpless, sat down with us to discuss how she trains both her male and female golfers. In this episode, you'll learn about Kaitlyn's philosophy through anecdotes on her college golf career as well as her knowledge on the menstrual cycle. If you're a female or train female golfers, you don't want to miss this one.

If you enjoyed this conversation and want to learn more about Kaitlyn, check out the avenues below to access more of her content.

Instagram: @felixfortisgolffitness

Website: www.felixfortisgolf.com

Podcast: The Felix Fortis Women's Golf Fitness Podcast on iTunes

Email: kaitlyn_sharpless@felixfortisgolf.com

Your Hips Suck. Here's What You Should Do

If you’re reading this then it’s probably true - your hips suck.

That’s okay, trust us. We’ve both struggled with the way our hips move, leading to frustrating chronic issues throughout the entire kinetic chain. From being in your situation before, we can assure that it doesn’t have to be this way. There’s always a way to improve the way you move or feel, regardless of your genetics, MRI readings, or lingering fears medical practitioners may have ingrained in your brain in the past.

As a strength coach and physical therapist tandem, one thing we pride ourselves on is treating you versus treating your diagnosis. You have IT Band Syndrome? A partially torn labrum? Glute “amnesia”? Well, what do these diagnoses really mean?

Everything we mentioned above can be the result from an infinite amount of variables.

  • What’s your injury history look like? Have you ever torn a ligament, tendon, or other type of connective tissue?

  • How well do you internally rotate your hips?

  • Can you extend your hip without compensating through your lower back?

  • Does your foot function the way a foot should function?

…and this is really just scratching the surface with the questions we can ask.

Without having you in front of us, it’s impossible to tell you what you specifically need. A thorough evaluation is the best way to determine where you currently are and how to map out where you want to be.

With that being said, here’s what you should do to progress your hip mobility and health.

Assess Yourself

If you follow us on social media, you’ve more than likely seen the acronym CARs in our posts. CARs, or Controlled Articular Rotations, are essentially the Swiss army knife of mobility training. We use CARs to maintain range of motion and strengthen the current ranges we have access to.

Alongside training, CARs are a self-assessment tool. They allow you to actively move one joint independently from the rest of the body’s joints. Can you move your shoulder overhead without side-bending or rotating the spine? Are you able to rotate your tibia (shin bone) without the ankle pronating or supinating? These are questions that you can answer by executing CARs with intent.

For the hips, you have to ask determine whether you can flex, extend, abduct, adduct, internally rotate, and externally rotate without compensation. This is a lot to ask, obviously.

However, if you want a healthy hip, you need to understand these movements and whether or not you’re capable of performing them without compensation.

This video further explains the benefits of CARs:

Perform CARs Daily

As great as CARs are, they won’t do much for you if you’re performing them once a week. We exhaust it to all of our clients that CARs have to be done every single day. We get asked all the time how many sets and reps should be done. Our answer?

“As many sets and as many reps as you can do on a daily basis.”

Now, this doesn’t mean that we want you to quit your job and give up the things you love for CARs. We’d be hypocrites if that was the case. However, we firmly believe that you can’t overdo it with CARs because of the bodyweight nature of the motion. Without external loading from gym equipment, it simply comes down to the joint being trained versus gravity.

If you can, try to perform one-to-two minutes of hip CARs after each meal. A few reps daily will go a lot further for you in the long run versus a surplus of CARs performed once every seven days.

Look at Other Joints

You’d be surprised at the number of people that come to us with “tight” hips that have hips that actually move pretty well. How is this possible?

When it comes to movement, the effect isn’t always the cause.

Your hip tightness can come from a multitude of issues at other joints. Remember that bullet point list from earlier? You might have noticed we mentioned how your foot functions. Your big toe, ankle, tibia, spine, and shoulders can all be culprits behind your hips not feeling too hot.

In one way or another, everything is connected. Don’t neglect the rest of your joints just because your left hip feels stuck.

Use Isometrics in Your Training

One final thing we want to touch on today is the use of isometrics within your training. Before explaining how we use isometrics, it’s important to understand what isometrics are.

An isometric muscular contraction is when a muscle group contracts at a certain joint angle and maintains this angle throughout the duration of the contraction. Basically, isometric training is when you hold a specific position and contract your muscles to make sure you aren’t moving.

We use isometrics a ton. With newer clients, we like to have them hold certain positions to understand what they should feel in said positions. TRX rows, squats, single-leg deadlifts, and Pallof presses are just a few of the movements we’ll use isometric holds with. Creating awareness in space with self-limiting movements is one of our main objectives when implementing isometrics.

Isometric training is also a great way to expand on your current ranges of motion. As we stated earlier, you’ve probably seen the acronyms PAILs and RAILs on our social media feeds at some point. PAILs and RAILs, or Progressive and Regressive Angular Isometric Loading, are isometric contractions in specific positions to help build connective tissue strength while creating capsular space at a joint. Because these are active isometric contractions, you don’t have to worry about creating instability at a joint when we mention creating space at the joint’s capsule.

Here’s an example of a hip internal rotation PAILs/RAILs contraction we like to use:

Isometrics are a safe and effective way to train a joint without to use of external load. If you’re someone that struggles with hip mobility, you should be engaging in some type of PAILs and RAILs work to further layer your CARs training.

Now, you might be thinking all of this is too overwhelming and your hip issues aren’t going anywhere anytime soon. We get it.

The most important thing that we’ll continue to emphasize is how you have to be consistent with your mobility training. You can have the perfect PAILs/RAILs setup to improve your hip rotation, but if you’re not performing it frequently, it really doesn’t matter. Hip mobility, just like any other type of skill acquisition, comes down to repeated exposure and execution with intent.

With this in mind, we want to offer you the opportunity to take your mobility training to levels you never thought possible. Our Virtual Kinstretch Program was built with one goal in mind - to provide an interactive experience to help you achieve your mobility goals if you don’t have access to in-person training.

For just a dollar, here’s what you’ll receive:

Have further questions about our Virtual Kinstretch Program or other services we offer? Drop a line below and we’ll get back to you!

How to Avoid Becoming a Statistic to Lower Back Pain [INFOGRAPHIC]

Lower back pain is the most common injury amongst golfers - both amateurs and professionals. In a sport that revolves around high-speed rotational movements repetitively in the same direction, it makes sense why your back is the first thing to give out.

However, it doesn’t have to be this way.

We’ve lived with frustrating lower back pain in the past and just assumed it was something we’d always deal with. Over the past few years, we’ve come to learn that taking the proper precautionary steps can go a long way to keeping your back feeling great after a weekend of golf.

The infographic below highlights what you should focus on to decrease the likelihood of injuring your lower back.

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All these action steps can be taken on with the help of a good strength coach, physical therapist, and swing coach. The most important thing you can do is conduct an evaluation with a credible professional that can determine the culprit behind your lower back issues.

Did you enjoy this infographic and find it helpful? Expect more in the near future. Drop a line below if there’s anything you’d like to see specifically!

Understanding Pain

Pain can be frustrating, debilitating, and negatively impacts our way of life. On top of this, it also starts to alter our mental stability and can lead to stress and other unwarranted emotions.

“Why do I have pain?”
“Did I do damage?”
“When can I play golf again?
“Why does it hurt after ________.”

This helplessness feeling you’re dealing with is due to the fact that you don’t understand what pain is, how it occurs, or ways to deal with it.

What Is Injury?

An injury is simple to define - when the load placed on the body exceeds the load it can absorb. When the accumulation of stress acting on the body (physical, emotional, social, mental, etc…) are greater than what your body perceives it can handle, pain occurs.

We can further think of pain as the body’s alarm system.

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With excessive stress, pain is the response mechanism used to alter our behavior. If we continue to add stress to the system, our alarm system becomes more sensitive and is set off more easily.

This is why pain typically starts off as an episode of “stiffness” or “tightness” after a round of golf. Over the course of time, this once minor bout can lead to full-fledged pain that prevents you from playing. If you never make the changes your body requests, stress will continue to accumulate and your alarm system becomes even more sensitive.

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It’s also important to understand that pain does directly correlate with structural damage.  

There are numerous research studies that have been conducted through medical imaging of healthy spines, shoulders, hips, and knees. The conclusion? They’ve found that a large percentage of these people have structural damage, whether it be labral tears, meniscus tears, herniated discs, etc.. So if there are scenarios where people present with structural damage, how come they present as asymptomatic when it comes to pain?

How Do We Get Out Of Pain?

An analogy we like to use in regards to looking at strength and tissue tolerance is by using a cup to represent our current capacities. The size of your cup determines how much stress your body can currently handle. The bigger your cup is in size, the more liquid can fill the cup. In this scenario, let’s imagine stress was the liquid being poured into the cup. Once the liquid poured into the cup exceeds the cup’s capacity, pain is the response.

With this analogy, there are two options we can choose in regards to improving tissue tolerance and mitigating the chances of pain.

The first option we can address is increasing the overall size of the cup. We can do this by gradually improving strength while increasing our range of motion capabilities.

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The second is to decrease the amount of stress acting on the body. This can come through numerous avenues including, but not limited to:

  • modifying your golf swing

  • playing fewer rounds

  • developing a recovery and prehabilitation routine

  • decreasing stressful factors in other areas of your everyday life

To conclude, pain is nothing more than the opinion of your body in its perceived current state. If you’re still not sold on this idea, check out this video on how your beliefs can actually exacerbate pain.

At this point, you probably want us to tell you how to get out of pain. The honest truth, however, is that there is no one-size-fits-all model with mitigating pain levels. The mission of this blog post is to simply help you better understand what pain is and that you shouldn’t fear it. There’s always a way to decrease pain levels and even eliminate it altogether with the proper approach.

If you’re currently suffering from chronic pain, you should seek out a credible physical therapist, or other medical provider that understands movement. Please don’t wait until it becomes debilitating. Pain should be addressed at first sign so you can build a bigger cup and correct any movement limitations. A combination of these two action steps will allow you to decrease stress levels and absorb any present stressors without consequences. This strategy will you spend less time in a physical therapy clinic, and more time on the golf course!

Interested in working with us and taking your performance to the next level? Fill out the form below to get started today!

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